Costa Rica

(506) 8992-9639

Orlando, FL

(407) 530-6790

New York, NY

(914) 349-7217

LAS PALMAS

BEACH RESORT
$ 6,900,000

PROJECT
UNDERSTANDING

La Palmas eco-beach resort, is located in the peninsula de Osa, next to the town of Puerto Jimenez in the southern pacific region of Costa Rica. Its 31.5 square hectares, beach front within the Golfo Dulce, gives it a pristine and priviliged location. White sand beaches and cristal clear waters provides for a perfect gateaway destination. An hour away fligth from San Jose, Las Palmas Beach Resort is a eco-friendly mix used resort, that combines comercial, hotel, residencial and pier facilities. Its Comercial areas promotes local indrustry as well as the local labor. The cocoon tent hotel craetes a unique natural experience. The eco-friendly condominuos and residential villa represents vernacular architecture.

THE SITE

THE AREA

HOW TO GET THERE

By land: From San José one can take the interamericana highway until La Chacarita gas station, then make a rigth turn till the Cañaza cross and then make a left turn. Travel time: 7 hours. Public transportation: From San José you can buy a bus ticket in Transportes Blanco Lobo to Puerto Jiménez. They are located in Barrio México, San José, 12 street, 7ave .Departure time: 8 a.m. and 12 m.d ,time of arrival: 8-9 hours. You can also get to Golfito, usign Tranportes Tracopa, then take a boat to Puerto Jiménez . By air: There are two airlines that fligth daily to Puerto Jimenez, Sansa and Nature Air. fligth time 1 hour. By sea: They are two ways to get there by boat, one is by Golfito them to Puerto Jiménez or by the Sierpe river.

PENÍNSULA DE OSA AND GOLFO DULCE

How to get there. By land: From San José one can take the interamericana highway until La Chacarita gas station, then make a rigth turn till the Cañaza cross and then make a left turn. Travel time: 7 hours. Public transportation: From San José you can buy a bus ticket in Transportes Blanco Lobo to Puerto Jiménez. They are located in Barrio México, San José, 12 street, 7ave .Departure time: 8 a.m. and 12 m.d ,time of arrival: 8-9 hours. You can also get to Golfito, usign Tranportes Tracopa, then take a boat to Puerto Jiménez . By air: There are two airlines that fligth daily to Puerto Jimenez, Sansa and Nature Air. fligth time 1 hour. By sea: They are two ways to get there by boat, one is by Golfito them to Puerto Jiménez or by the Sierpe river. Containing a huge swathe of Pacific rain forest, the Osa is crammed with life. What’s more, you can actually see it. From the army ants toiling away, to the scarlet macaws squawking in the almond trees, from Baird’s tapirs hanging around Sirena ranger station, to the four species of monkeys swinging in the trees, this is undoubtedly Costa Rica’s top spot to witness life at its wildest. And not only in Parque Nacional Corcovado – although that’s the obvious place – but also in the surrounding reserves that create a biological corridor around the gulf. And there are plenty of sleepy beachside towns like Bahía Drake to laze around in plus brilliant surfing at Pavones or Zancudo. The peninsula protects the Golfo Dulce from the powerful Pacific, attracting groups of whales and dolphins to its tranquil waters. Fringing the bay, miles of shoreline are populated with swaying palms and prodigious birdlife, but hardly a human soul. While the Guaymí Indians were the earliest inhabitants of the Osa and still live here, much of this area was never populated or developed by Ticos. It means that roads are poor and most of the peninsula is still off the grid. In recent years, all those superlatives have attracted the attention of foreigners who want to trade in their workaday world for a piece of paradise.

CORCOVADO NATIONAL PARK

Corcovado National Park is a National Park on the Osa Peninsula in Osa (canton), southwestern Costa Rica (9° North, 83° West), which is part of the Osa Conservation Area. It was established on 24 October 1975, and encompasses an area of 424 square kilometres (164 sq mi). It is the largest park in Costa Rica and protects about a third of the Osa Peninsula. It is widely considered the crown jewel in the extensive system of national parks and biological reserves spread across the country. The ecological variety is quite stunning. National Geographic has called it “the most biologically intense place on Earth in terms of biodiversity”. Not only is the park very popular with tropical ecologists, a visitor can expect to see an abundance of wildlife. One should come well prepared though. The park conserves the largest primary forest on the American Pacific coastline and one of the few remaining sizable areas of lowland tropical rainforests in the world. Historically, logging has taken place in lowland areas because those areas are more easily accessible and contain the largest and most economically valuable trees. But those habitats, which feature diverse vegetation, are also usually the richest in biodiversity. So even though approximately half the tropical rainforests on Earth remain, what is left of the originally rich lowland tropical rainforests is usually in too small an area to support the original natural biodiversity. Larger animals, especially, need a large habitat free of human activity. Unfortunately this means that even tourism, the economic incentive for Costa Rica and other developing nations to preserve and protect parks such as Corcovado, actually threatens the long-term biodiversity of the park. Corcovado is home to a sizable population of the endangered Baird’s Tapir and even a small population of the very rare Harpy Eagle. The park’s rivers and lagoons are home to populations of both the American crocodile and Spectacled Caiman, along with Bull sharks. Corcovado is also one of the final strongholds of the Jaguar within Central America and several other felines are also present, including Ocelot, Margay, Jaguarundi, and Puma. All four Costa Rican monkey species can be seen within the park, including the endangered Central American Squirrel Monkey, White-faced Capuchin, Mantled Howler, and Geoffroy’s Spider Monkey. Other mammals present include Two-toed and Three-toed Sloth, Collared Peccary, Northern Tamandua and Silky Anteater. Poison dart frogs and several species of snake (including the venomous Fer-de-Lance and Bushmaster) are also common within the park.

SPORTFISHING (SOUTHERN PACIFIC REGION)

Golfito is the center of activity on Costa Rica’s southern coast. It’s a rare day during peak season that boats don’t raise a dozen sails and a marlin or two, along with plenty of jacks, runners, mackerel and perhaps an amberjack, roosterfish or big snapper inshore. Light-tackle fishing inside the bay off Golfito, with its profusion of small coves and rocky islets, as well as off the shoreline, is good for small barracuda and snapper, corbina and occasional snook to more than 40 pounds. Operators offer day charters and three- to five-day packages with all meals, lodging and an open bar. One of the lodges there has posted more than 40 IGFA records on various species. Fishing the drop-off outside Matapalo produces sails, marlin, tuna and other blue-water species, and inshore there are roosters that average more than 30 pounds (a couple up to 100 pounds), grouper, jacks, barracuda, trophy-size Pacific cubera snapper and more. Zancudo operators also offer snook trips that have become increasingly popular during the past couple of years, working the river mouths and estuary at Zancudo, while some of the boats out of Golfito fish snook north of there, at the mouth of the Río Esquinas. Marlin: August through December is peak season, but an occasional blue or black may be taken most any month if the water temperature is up. This year, the marlin bite was incredible from February in March, with some to 750 pounds. Sailfish: A few taken off and on year-round with the exceptional fishing from December through March. Often slows from April into early June, then picks up again and begins to peak in August or September. Tuna: Best fishing for the bigger ones corresponds with marlin and sailfish season, but the schools of footballs can nearly always be found outside. Dorado: Best runs are traditionally from late May through October Wahoo: Not abundant, but an occasional wahoo may be taken most any time of the year while trolling offshore for billfish, or around the structure off Matapalo. Roosterfish: Region is famous for its big roosters and they can be caught virtually any month of the year, some to nearly 100 pounds. Snook: All year, but best from middle or late May through July and January and February.

SURFING IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC REGION

Just park on the only road, and surf it during middle or high tide,It is for experienced surfers only. Matapalo is one of 4 point breaks there. Pan Dulce is the first you drive by. Very gentle longboard wave most days, hits at low tide. Next is Backwask: holds amazingly large swell. Next is Matapalo-it is the ultimate “critical” wave. Large group of rocks on the inside. Finally (and much less surfed, working only on high tide becvause of very dangerous rocks) ; which is basically the headland point of the Osa Penninsula. Starting at the Crack and working back, each break will be a bit smaller. These are all relatively rocky breaks BUT if there is a good south swell the place is amazing. Don’t believe the territorial stuff some people right, it’s just the locals trying to keep people that can actually surf out. VERY expensive lodging and very little of it. Only one cantina nearby. It is about 10 hours dive from SJ. You must drive through 3 rivers so if it rains hard you are not leaving till the water subsides. Puerto Jimenez is a laid back little town, safe and tranquillo. I have been there many times and have had some of my favorite surf trips there. It is very hit and miss but it is absolutely the most beautiful place I have ever seen. Monkeys and parrots in the trees everywhere. It is not a bad place just to be, surf is a bonus.

ARCHITECTURAL PROPOSAL